Child Soup: The Answer to Asean’s Winter Chills

Estimated Reading Time: 2 minutes |

Take one mid-size child, a large wok partially filled with water, and a fire made from twigs. Set the child in wok and leave to simmer. A safe basting child such as the one above will ease the amount of effort required.  No, no, no. Wait! That’s not what this is about at all.

While visitors to Asean often have difficulty understanding that the word ‘cool’ to the regions inhabitants can mean temperatures as low (high) as 25C (77F), once the mercury drops below 20C (68F) it’s definitely time to drag out the fleecy jackets and hoodies.

Not unsurprisingly Asean’s cold winter hits its most vulnerable the hardest. With the cold season now well underway deaths have already been reported throughout the region, while private and public agencies are busily collecting blankets and warm weather clothing for distribution to those most at risk.

However, while the hoodies, blankets, hats, and gloves will be a welcome relief to many, they don’t solve the problem of the chilling effects of a morning shower.

The video above shows how a hot-water bath can still be enjoyed despite the plummeting winter temperatures. Thought to have been recorded in Myanmar, the video shows a child squatting in a wok atop a roaring fire, calmly pouring the warm water over himself.

Since late October Asean’s winter chill has been creeping through the region. Residents in northern Thailand, the north of Vietnam, and some parts of Myanmar and Lao PDR are feeling the effects the most, with temperatures already reported below 15C (59F), and lower at higher altitudes.

Visitors to Asean at this time of the year with extra capacity in their luggage can help alleviate the effects of Asean’s winter by bringing a few extra pieces of winter clothing from home with them for distribution to the regions needy and vulnerable. Irrespective of which Asean country you visit, at this time of the year your winter clothing will be most appreciated.

As to why the child in the video isn’t getting his feet burnt? If you look carefully you will see he is standing quite high in the wok. At several points in the video a flash of red can be seen in the bottom of the wok leaving us to believe that he is standing on a small stool often found in Asean bathrooms.

 

Feature video @ChangeClip

 

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