Science or magic? wild energy drink life hacks to mess with your head (video)

In a world of increasing interconnectivity where ‘Life Hacks’ go viral across the internet within hours, there seems to be no end to people’s’ creativity and imagination.

Energy drinks are a popular sight throughout Asean member countries, Thailand’s Red Bull and the American Monster Energy two that can be found in most countries in the region.

YouTuber Rick Lax started pondering the effects all of that sugar, caffeine, artificial and natural colourings and flavours on items outside the body and came up with the video above, totally messing with our heads.

Taking a number of commonly found household items he subjects them to the energy drink sustainability test in the five-minute-long video. If you are already feeling squeamish from that can of energy drink you slammed down on the way to work, this is not the video for you. However, if you are enjoying your sugar-caffeine buzz, continue watching.

Starting off simple, Mr Lax first shows the magical restorative ability of an energy drink, when a balloon with the tip cut of is immersed into a glass containing some and is magically healed, and able to be inflated.

Next, an apparent ceramic mug is magically turned brittle after energy drink and hand sanitiser are mixed together, while a mango turns positively plasticy after a good dunking.

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Similarly eggs fried in energy drink also magically take on a plasticised structure, while what magically happens to a breadstick and the wooden handle of a hammer will have you nursing your stomach.

To date the video has since garnered more than 250,000 views and 500 comments, with more than a handful of science teachers confirming the educational value of not believing everything you see on the internet.

‘As a Science teacher of 30 yrs, I did all these for my students in a lesson to show that everything they see on the internet and on social media is NOT real! Fact is none of the work (sic)! A few bucks spent out of pocket to teach kids not to believe everything they see is well worth it!’, one said.

‘What’s sad is I know people who actually think this is real’, said another viewer.

A student said ‘My mom showed this to me because I drink energy drinks. She was thinking this might convince me not to drink them any more’, to which someone had replied, ‘Facebook moms, am i rite (sic) lmao.

Yet another was more forthright: ‘It is frightening the amount of people sharing this on Facebook thinking that energy drinks actually do this stuff’.

While Life Hacks are common these days, and some outstanding examples there are, the giveaway with Mr Lax’s Life Hack is in the title: ‘they work like magic’; and magic is indeed what it is. But don’t take our word for it, or anyone else’s. Go out and try yourself. That way you will know the answer for sure.

 

 

Feature video Rick Lax

 

 

Related:

  • 31 Amazing Hacks you Should Try (5-Minute Crafts)
  • 20 Amazing Science Experiments and Optical Illusions! Compilation 2017 (Home Science)

 

 

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Stella-maris Ewudolu

Journalist at AEC News Today

Stella-maris graduated with a Bachelor of Arts, Education from Ebonyi State University, Nigeria in 2005.

Between November 2010 and February 2012 she was a staff writer at Daylight Online, Nigeria writing on health, fashion, and relationships. From 2010 – 2017 she worked as a freelance screen writer for ‘Nollywood’, Nigeria.

She joined AEC News Today in December 2016.

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2 Responses to "Science or magic? wild energy drink life hacks to mess with your head (video)"

  1. Con Gubser   June 13, 2020 at 3:45 pm

    After watching this video on the reactions of energy drinks on some common items, I don’t know if I believe what I saw or not ! The article says that a science teacher disproved all of these to his/her students. Should I believe what I saw, or what I read ???

    Reply
    • Steven Galvin   July 12, 2020 at 8:04 am

      Instead of believing what you see or read, why don’t you try the experiments yourself?

      Reply

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